More BBC pedos spilling.


A woman has come forward after the ITV documentary on October 3 to tell producers that she was abused by a well-known media figure when she was a child.
The new allegations concern a TV personality who is still alive, but he has not been named.
As well as Savile, singer Gary Glitter, 68, and comic Freddie Starr, 69, have been caught up in the scandal. Starr has vigorously denied accusations he molested a girl in Savile's BBC dressing room when she was 14.
A member of the ITV production team said: "We have had a name given to us which is so far not in the public domain.
"It relates to a celebrity, a media personality, who is alive. We are urging everyone who contacts us to go straight to the police."
It comes as a tenth police force contacted Scotland Yard to pass on a further allegation about Savile.
The abuse scandal has now spread to the late star’s home town of Scarborough after a woman came forward claiming she was assaulted by him there in the 1980s.
The woman who was a teenager at the time of the alleged assault reported the incident to North Yorkshire police as the string of claims against the late TV star continued to grow.
It is the first allegation to be made connected to the town closely associated with Sir Jimmy and where he was buried following his death in October last year.
It is thought that the woman, who now lives in the Midlands, had been on holiday in Scarborough at the time of the alleged offence.
A spokesman for North Yorkshire police said: “The offence involving a young girl is alleged to have taken place in Scarborough in the late-1980s.
“This is the first report received by the force in connection with the enquiry and it has been referred to the Metropolitan Police Service who are co-ordinating the investigation.”
BBC Director General, George Entwistle, has defended the Corporation’s response to the Jimmy Savile scandal and insisted he is happy with his own role in the affair.

AND THIS ....


With pressure building on the BBC and senior staff working during the 70s and 80s to explain what they knew about Jimmy Savile sex abuse claims, a book by a top journalist revealsdetails of alleged paedophilia involving another children’s broadcasting star at the corporation.
Working as a fledgling hack in the late 1960s, BBC world affairs editor John Simpson was tasked with reporting the death of a former BBC children’s entertainer – given the pseudonym ‘Uncle Dick’ in his book Strange Places Questionable People
Calling a former co-star for reaction to his passing, Simpson was shocked to hear Uncle Dick described as an “evil bastard”:
“Week after week, children from all over the country would win competitions to visit the BBC and meet Uncle Dick. He would welcome them, show them round, give them lunch, and then take them to the Gents and interfere with them.”
Sound familiar?
“If their parents complained afterwards, she said the Director-General’s office would write and say the nation wouldn’t understand such an accusation against a much loved figure.”
Relating this discovery to his editor, Simpson was then admonished for being a “destructive young idiot”  before a full scale newsroom cover up was orchestrated. The copy written up for newsreaders read as follows:
Uncle Dick’s partner for many years — Auntie Gladys — told the BBC that she was deeply saddened by his death. She said “He had a wonderful way with children.”
As with the fawning tribute to Jimmy Savile broadcast after his death in 2011, BBC managers wouldn’t allow serious allegations of child abuse to tarnish the reputation of one of their stars.
Some things never change.